Upcoming events

    • 30 Jun 2017
    • https://asem.org/Society-Awards

    Nominations for ASEM Awards Due

    For more information about this and all of ASEM's Society Awards, please visit: https://asem.org/Society-Awards  

    Bernard R. Sarchet Award

    The Bernard R. Sarchet Award is considered to be the highest award given by ASEM. This award recognizes contributions to the Society and to the field of engineering management and is annually given to an ASEM member who has contributed the most to the Society on a local, national and/or international basis. Nominations can be submitted based on positive contributions in the following areas:

    • Publication of technical papers
    • Service as a local, national or international officer or committee member
    • Participation in the ASEM International Annual Conference
    • Contribution to the EM Body of Knowledge or EM Handbook
    • Management of seminars, workshops, symposia, webinars, or training sessions
    • National and international promotion of the Society.

    Frank Woodbury Special Service Award

    The Frank Woodbury Special Service Award recognizes an ASEM member who has provided outstanding service to the Society.

    This award is given annually to an active ASEM member who has demonstrated proof of continued service excellence to ASEM. Nominations can be submitted based on positive contributions in the following areas:

    • Support of EMJ through significant contribution to editorial content (articles, editing, reviewing, etc.)
    • Repeated service as ASEM International Annual Conference track chair or conference chair
    • Outstanding service on a local, national or international committee
    • Exemplary contribution to development of the EM Body of Knowledge or EM Handbook
    • Repeated delivery or development of ASEM training products or services
    • Continued promotion of the Society.

    Founder’s Awards

    Undergraduate: To recognize undergraduate engineering management program leadership. Eligible programs have: An active undergraduate program in engineering management, Demonstrated contributions to engineering management education and practice, Recommendations from stakeholders outside of their institution including employers and alumni, and Other significant achievements related to undergraduate engineering management program leadership.

    Graduate: To recognize graduate engineering management program leadership. Eligible programs have: An active graduate program which offers a graduate degree in engineering management, Demonstrated contributions to graduate engineering management education and practice, Recommendations from stakeholders outside of the institution including employers and alumni, and Other significant achievements related to graduate engineering management program leadership.

    Student Chapter: To recognize ASEM student chapter excellence. All active ASEM student chapters are eligible. Each of eight criterion are rated on a score from 1 to 10 with 10 being highest: Quality of Submission, Active Student Participation, ASEM International Annual Conference Participation, Engineering Management Projects, Community Projects, Faculty Involvement, Support for the Engineering Management Profession, and EM Practice.

    Presidential Award – Local Section

    The Presidential Award – Local Section annually recognizes ASEM local section excellence. All active ASEM local sections are eligible. Criteria for this award include:

    • Section membership and demonstrated participation
    • Participation in the ASEM International Annual Conference
    • Publication of technical papers and delivery of seminars and workshops
    • Other contributions to the field of engineering management.

    Best Dissertation Award

    The Best Dissertation Award annually recognizes the PhD dissertation that makes the most significant contribution to the engineering management field.

    The award winning dissertation will:

    • Contribute significant extensions of EM concepts
    • Have effective integration of analytical and management concerns as a primary premise
    • Include high quality design of the study and collection of data
    • Make conclusions with broad application to a range of EM organizations.

    William Daughton World Headquarters Service Award

    This award recognizes significant contributions to the streamlining, enhancement, or improvement of the day-to-day operations of ASEM world headquarters.

    This award recognizes an active ASEM member for their contribution of time, effort, or implemented idea that significantly enhanced or improved the day-to-day operation of ASEM including but not limited to:

    • WHQ processes and procedures,
    • ASEM website and other communications,
    • WHQ office arrangements and accommodations.



    • 30 Jun 2017
    • https://goo.gl/forms/1d2AhwVRvNOhWhti2

    Members, please vote now!

    Votes will be tallied on June 30, 2017

    Three excellent candidates have been nominated for the position of ASEM Secretary.  The person who accepts this service opportunity will be in line to serve on the board as:

    • 2017-2018  Secretary 
    • 2018-2019  President-Elect 
    • 2019-2020  President
    • 2020-2021  Past-President
    Ballot Located At:  https://goo.gl/forms/1d2AhwVRvNOhWhti2

      The 2017 Candidates for ASEM Secretary are:

      Simon Philbin 

      Dr Simon Philbin is Director of Programme Management at Imperial College London in the United Kingdom, where he leads the Programme Management Office (PMO) that is focused on supporting a range of major research projects across Imperial. Dr Philbin is also the Chairman of Imperial College Projects Limited, which is a subsidiary of Imperial. He has worked at Imperial for nearly 14 years and previously with the UK Ministry of Defence for 9 years. With a PhD in chemistry and an MBA, Dr Philbin has authored/co-authored over 50 technical publications (journal and conference papers) across several areas, including project management, research & technology management, and chemistry. Dr Philbin has attended and presented at the last 9 ASEM annual conferences and he has served as the International Director of ASEM since 2014.


      Bill Schell  


      Dr. Bill Schell has been a society member since 2006, while he was working in industry and pursuing his doctorate in Engineering Management at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. During his fourteen year industry career he ran large scale reengineering and quality projects and programs for American Express and Wells Fargo Bank and organizational development and technology operations for PrintingForLess.com, Since moving into an academic career in 2010, he has consistently promoted the engineering management profession and ASEM. He has been active in the engineering management area of the Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers (IISE) and currently serves as the Chair of the Engineering Management Division of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). His work has won several awards in engineering management related areas from ASEE, EMJ, and IISE. In addition, he has been very engaged in the development and operation of the new student section at Montana State University. Finally, since 2015 has served as ASEM’s Student Membership Director. During this time the society has experienced two years of double digit student membership growth, nearly doubled the number of student sections, and launched the new Academic partnership program.


      Annmarie Uliano 


      Ms. Annmarie Uliano lives in Boston, MA. She has her B.S. in Industrial Engineering, M.S. in Engineering Management, and a Certificate in Engineering Business from Northeastern University, Boston. She is currently an Associate Project Manager for Lahey Health in Burlington, MA. Annmarie was a co-founder of the Northeastern University student chapter of ASEM, and a key member in building up the organization due to leadership experience in other student groups at Northeastern. She was initially elected into the position of Secretary and served in that capacity for 9 months. She then transitioned to Vice President of Programs, and went on to plan the events and activities for the Spring 2017 semester while mentoring the newly elected Secretary. In recognition for her work building up the ASEM Student chapter at Northeastern, she was awarded the Master’s level Student Leadership Award and the Director of Engineering Management’s Award in 2017. Prior to her leadership in ASEM, she served as Membership Chair, Treasurer for 3 terms, and President of the Society of Women Engineers at Northeastern University. Annmarie is passionate about healthcare, mentorship, STEM outreach, and kayaking.


      • 01 Jul 2017
      • http://asem.org/Professional-Membership

      Member Dues Set to Increase

      Dues for professional membership with ASEM are set to increase from $125 to the new annual rate of $135, beginning July 1, 2017. We encourage all non-members to join prior to July 1 to take advantage of the lower member fee. Current members, regardless of your join/renewal date, may add another year to your membership at the current rate until July 1.

      If you have any questions or needs regarding membership, please contact the ASEM World Headquarters at asem-hq@asem.org.


      • 06 Jul 2017
      • 07 Jul 2017
      • Valencia, Spain
      Engineering Management Conference in Europe

      ASEM is proud to be a co-organizer of the 3rd International Joint Conference (IJC 2017) on “New Global Perspectives on Industrial Engineering and Management”.

      The conference will be held in Valencia (Spain) on July 6 & 7, 2017 and brings together international researchers in industrial engineering and engineering management from leading engineering societies around the world, such as ABEPRO (Associação Brasileira de Engenharia de Produção), ADINGOR (Asociación para el Desarrollo de la Ingeniería de Organización), IISE (Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers), AIM (European Academy for Industrial Management) and ASEM (American Society for Engineering Management).  

      The conference offers a unique opportunity for networking, a high quality scientific program and an exciting social program. Selected papers of the conference will be invited to submit their paper to various prestigious journals, including the Engineering Management Journal (ASEM) and Frontiers of Engineering Management (Chinese Academy of Engineering).

      Details can be found here or the conference website: www.icieom.org

      Important deadlines:

      Full paper OR extended abstract submission     6 Mar 2017

      Notifications of results to authors                        17 Apr 2017

      Final versions of full papers                                 15 May 2017

      • 11 Jul 2017
      • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (EDT)
      • Virtual (Registration Required)

      Sponsored by ASEM - IISE/SEMS - CAE- ABEPRO

      Presenter

      Thomas Wilpert

      Error Management - Just Culture in Aviation

      If you want to deal with errors you will have to know them first. But do we get all the information that we need? What about those mistakes or mishaps that can be easily hidden because they did not cause any obvious damage and hence remained unnoticed?  The question is whether employees share all their experiences voluntarily or do they hide them because they fear retribution?

      Unlocking hidden information that cannot be gained by a traditional monitoring system is the key for a successful learning culture. A proactive or even predictive approach requires the involvement of the relevant staff. To achieve this, it is imperative to have an atmosphere of trust in which people are encouraged and feel responsible to provide all essential information in the clear understanding that the company accepts that errors and lapses of judgement may occur and that staff, in the course of their normal, expected duties, do not intentionally commit such errors. The only exceptions to this general non-punitive policy are where the actions or omissions involve negligence, reckless disregard or a failure to report safety incidents or risk exposures. 

      The Just Culture approach aims to ensure a relationship of trust and an understanding of what is acceptable and unacceptable that is supported by all employees. It provides the key for gaining the information an organization needs to analyze and manage its errors and mistakes.


      Presenter Biography

      Captain Thomas Wilpert is the Safety Manager of a major European airline. He spent more than 16000 hours in a Boeing 737/757 and Airbus A320/330 cockpit and today flies as a Commander on the A330. He previously worked in a range of flight training positions including TRI/TRE. He also served an eight year term as Quality Assurer Flight Operations and Training. Thomas majored in business administration before he started his flying career.

      Thomas' commitment to developing, implementing, maintaining and constantly improving strategies and processes to achieve the highest level of safety made him introduce different approaches in terms of error management. In order to increase the rate of highly critical information, Thomas and his team introduced a new just culture approach which was unique at this time. In the meantime the quantity and quality of information has increased significantly.


      This webinar is the second in a four-part series.


      Webinar Series

      What happens if someone makes a mistake or takes the wrong decision? The issue here is not intentional misconduct, fraudulent behaviour, gross negligence or large-scale mismanagement, but the little mistakes, errors and poor decisions that occur every single day. Mostly, errors are the result of momentary blackouts, a temporary short circuit in the brain, false impressions, deceptive memories, dots wrongly joined, fragments of conversation that we interpret incorrectly, prejudices, momentary feelings of mental imbalance, disorientation, stress and other disturbances.

      What does this mean for larger organizations? From research we know that speaking-up when spotting errors is not the norm in organizations. Mistakes are still associated with shame and embarrassment. Yet factual error management can work and be successful as can be seen by studying high reliability organizations such as aviation, medicine, and the nuclear industry.

      In the webinar series on error management we will look into the practices and learnings from these high reliability organizations. Apart from the specifics of the different industries we will reflect on what is necessary to establish an effective open error culture. This includes psychological safety to enable communication across hierarchical levels, a system of error reporting, a leadership culture, where people are empowered to speak up, and how humans interact in complex systems.

      The speakers are either researchers or practitioners and provide insights into lessons learned from their field. The series will explore how these learnings may be applied in other organizations.

      The webinar series is scheduled as follows. Please note that EACH webinar has its own URL for registration.

      June 20 - Introduction to error management (Jan Hagen, ESMT Berlin) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2566166

      July 11 - Error management and reporting culture in aviation (Thomas Wilpert, Air Berlin) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568371

      July 25 - Empowerment as tool for error management in medicine (Jan Brommundt, University Medical Center Groningen) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568393

      August 8 - Management practices of learning from errors in high risk industries (Nicolas Dechy, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568621
      • 25 Jul 2017
      • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (EDT)
      • Virtual (Registration Required)

      Sponsored by ASEM - IISE/SEMS - CAE- ABEPRO

      Presenter

      Jan Brommundt

      Error Management - Empowerment as a Tool for Error Management in Medicine

      This talk illustrates that any error-management system, its techniques, and its structures need to be embedded in a broader error-management culture. Non-innovative and overly hierarchical structures are incompatible with such a culture, and the empowerment of personnel traditionally in the lower echelons of hierarchical systems (nurses, air hostesses) is a necessary, efficient, and cost-effective precondition and cornerstone for such a system.

      In accordance with the author’s background, most examples and experiences described are from the medical field.


      Presenter Biography

      Dr. Brommundt leads the cardiac anesthesia team at Groningen University Hospital and teaches medicine and public health in humanitarian action at the Rijks Universiteit Groningen. He has worked in conflict zones with doctors-without-borders and médecins-du-monde since 2004 and holds a degree in health economy. Jan serves as the Medical Director of MELONET, an international repatriation organization. For the last years Jan has focused on non-technical skills, error management, communication and multidisciplinary crew resource management to increase the performance of his teams.

      This webinar is the third in a four-part series.


      Webinar Series

      What happens if someone makes a mistake or takes the wrong decision? The issue here is not intentional misconduct, fraudulent behaviour, gross negligence or large-scale mismanagement, but the little mistakes, errors and poor decisions that occur every single day. Mostly, errors are the result of momentary blackouts, a temporary short circuit in the brain, false impressions, deceptive memories, dots wrongly joined, fragments of conversation that we interpret incorrectly, prejudices, momentary feelings of mental imbalance, disorientation, stress and other disturbances.

      What does this mean for larger organizations? From research we know that speaking-up when spotting errors is not the norm in organizations. Mistakes are still associated with shame and embarrassment. Yet factual error management can work and be successful as can be seen by studying high reliability organizations such as aviation, medicine, and the nuclear industry.

      In the webinar series on error management we will look into the practices and learnings from these high reliability organizations. Apart from the specifics of the different industries we will reflect on what is necessary to establish an effective open error culture. This includes psychological safety to enable communication across hierarchical levels, a system of error reporting, a leadership culture, where people are empowered to speak up, and how humans interact in complex systems.

      The speakers are either researchers or practitioners and provide insights into lessons learned from their field. The series will explore how these learnings may be applied in other organizations.

      The webinar series is scheduled as follows. Please note that EACH webinar has its own URL for registration.

      June 20 - Introduction to error management (Jan Hagen, ESMT Berlin) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2566166

      July 11 - Error management and reporting culture in aviation (Thomas Wilpert, Air Berlin) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568371

      July 25 - Empowerment as tool for error management in medicine (Jan Brommundt, University Medical Center Groningen) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568393

      August 8 - Management practices of learning from errors in high risk industries (Nicolas Dechy, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568621
      • 08 Aug 2017
      • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (EDT)
      • Virtual (Registration Required)

      Sponsored by ASEM - IISE/SEMS - CAE- ABEPRO

      Presenter

      Nicolas Dechy

      Error Management - Management Practices of Learning From Errors in High Risk Industries

      Accidents are caused by multiple causes, influence factors, conditions that occur at a variety of sociotechnical levels (equipment failure, staffing inadequacy, deficient management, lack of regulatory oversight) along a timeline that can last for years. Indeed, latent failures, weak signals, precursors, near-misses, alerts, are not treated accordingly. Lessons from industrial accidents show that failures to learn are one of the recurring root and systemic causes of accidents. Starting from these lessons, the stakes, challenges and requirements are identified and can be adapted. They are discussed with regards to some good practices and recent changes in some high-risk industries.

      Presenter Biography

      Nicolas Dechy is currently employed at the French National Institute of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (IRSN) that provides expertise to the regulator. He conducts organizational and human factors assessment of safety and radiation protection management of maintenance activities, subcontracting, and emergency response in the aftermath of Fukushima. As an engineer, he has expert experience in the field of accident investigation (Toulouse disaster), chemical risk assessment, emergency response and crisis management in process safety (Seveso). He has conducted several assessments, studies, engineering and researches on learning from experience especially on failures and barriers to learn with European Safety and Reliability Data Association and Institut pour la maîtrise des risques association.

      This webinar is the fourth in a four-part series.


      Webinar Series

      What happens if someone makes a mistake or takes the wrong decision? The issue here is not intentional misconduct, fraudulent behaviour, gross negligence or large-scale mismanagement, but the little mistakes, errors and poor decisions that occur every single day. Mostly, errors are the result of momentary blackouts, a temporary short circuit in the brain, false impressions, deceptive memories, dots wrongly joined, fragments of conversation that we interpret incorrectly, prejudices, momentary feelings of mental imbalance, disorientation, stress and other disturbances.

      What does this mean for larger organizations? From research we know that speaking-up when spotting errors is not the norm in organizations. Mistakes are still associated with shame and embarrassment. Yet factual error management can work and be successful as can be seen by studying high reliability organizations such as aviation, medicine, and the nuclear industry.

      In the webinar series on error management we will look into the practices and learnings from these high reliability organizations. Apart from the specifics of the different industries we will reflect on what is necessary to establish an effective open error culture. This includes psychological safety to enable communication across hierarchical levels, a system of error reporting, a leadership culture, where people are empowered to speak up, and how humans interact in complex systems.

      The speakers are either researchers or practitioners and provide insights into lessons learned from their field. The series will explore how these learnings may be applied in other organizations.

      The webinar series is scheduled as follows. Please note that EACH webinar has its own URL for registration.

      June 20 - Introduction to error management (Jan Hagen, ESMT Berlin) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2566166

      July 11 - Error management and reporting culture in aviation (Thomas Wilpert, Air Berlin) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568371

      July 25 - Empowerment as tool for error management in medicine (Jan Brommundt, University Medical Center Groningen) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568393

      August 8 - Management practices of learning from errors in high risk industries (Nicolas Dechy, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) - 1:00 PM EDT
      Register here: https://www.asem.org/event-2568621
      • 11 Aug 2017
      • 5:00 AM
      • http://asem.org/ASEM-Scholarships

      The American Society for Engineering Management (ASEM) awards a $500 undergraduate scholarship and $500 graduate scholarship each academic year.

      Scholarship Requirements:  To be eligible, at the time the application is submitted, applicants must be current members of ASEM, must be enrolled full-time in an undergraduate or graduate program (minimum of 12 hours for undergraduate students or 9 hours for graduate students), must have a graduation date at least a year into the future, and must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 for undergraduate students or 3.5 for graduate students.

      Please visit  http://asem.org/ASEM-Scholarships for more information, including application link, etc.

      • 18 Oct 2017
      • 21 Oct 2017
      • Huntsville, Alabama, USA



      'Reimagining Systems Engineering and Management'

      Hosted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville

      October 18th – 21st, 2017

      Marriott Hotel  - Huntsville, Alabama, USA


                https://www.asem.org/2017_IAC


    Proud Corporate Members of ASEM Include


    Lawrence Livermore

    National Lab

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